The History of Medicine, Part 3

TRACY LATZ MD continues on from her previous articles about the history of alternative medicine. In this final instalment, she concludes that modern medicine is missing a lot by ignoring the wisdom of the ancients, and suggests ways that medical students and physicians could once again become initiates into a sacred holistic healing path for both their self and their patients. The so-called “new discoveries” of modern science are often only rediscoveries of secrets well known to the healers, priests and philosophers of ancient “pagan” times.

Man’s inhumanity to man has resulted in the loss of wisdom, records and formula: which, had they been preserved, would have solved many of the greatest problems of this civilization. With sword and firebrand, conquerors obliterate the records of their predecessors, and then inevitably meet with an untimely fate for need of the very wisdom they have destroyed.

Modern healthcare is often symptom-focused and reactive, rather than prevention-focused and proactive. We have truly taken a separatist rather than a holistic view of medicine – separating out various medical specialties to deal with different physical body parts or systems and relegating anything that has to do with the astral (emotional/thought) body to the psychiatrists and psychologists. Spiritual issues have been relegated to spiritual advisors and the clergy of the church, temple or synagogue of the patient’s choice.

Patients and physicians rarely discuss nutrition, exercise, and lifestyle change, and instead focus mainly on physical diagnosis and treatment of physical disease that has already manifested. Many clinicians feel unprepared to discuss the safe and effective use of dietary supplements or herbal medicines, or how to help patients incorporate relaxation, spiritual, or mind-body practices into their lives.

Mind-body-spirit medicine

In addition to the traditional Western medical school courses of anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, microbiology, physical examination/diagnosis, medication/therapeutic treatment of disease, and medical ethics, a holistic approach to medical training in the new era will necessitate inclusion of nutrition, herbal remedies, homeopathic remedies, mind-body medicine, energy medicine (based on Traditional Chinese Medicine), energy psychology, the responsibility and power of personal choice of the patient, as well as a metaphysical education of students in the ancient wisdom of spiritual/intuitive development, astrological medicine, spiritual anatomy/energetic subtle bodies (chakras; and etheric, astral and spiritual), spiritual healing, color and sound healing, other vibrational healing modalities (toning, sacred names/chants, tuning forks on meridians, crystal use), soul logos, and reflective etheric healing.

In short, medical students and physicians would once again become initiates into a sacred healing path for both their self and their patients. The soul of the healer thus trained to reach a state of high vibration (with awareness of the whole person – body, mind and spirit) would then connect with the soul of the patient who had a true desire to return to or maintain a state of vibrant health. With Love all things and all healings are possible – and in this new era of medicine complete healing will be possible in body (physical and etheric), mind/emotion, and spirit.

Here’s to a future of whole person healing…

Loads of Light!

Tracy Latz, M.D.


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 Many thanks to Shift Your Life for permission to use an extract from this article.

One comment

  1. Pingback: The History of Medicine, Part 2 | The Therapy Book

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