Are you deficient in vitamin B12?

by Paul Fassa

If you’re a vegetarian or a vegan who’s never heard of chlorella, the chances are that you are deficient in vitamin 12.

Awareness of vitamin B12’s importance is getting more attention lately. Every cell in our body uses vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 deficiency is more common than previously considered, and low B12 levels mimic many symptoms of other diseases.

Most professional health practitioners don’t consider it as a probable cause for their patients’ symptoms. Also, the common blood serum test may read high enough, but the reading probably includes what is termed human-inactive B12, which does little or nothing for your cells.

Although vegetarians and vegans are more prone to B12 deficiency, it occurs among meat eaters as well. Except for chlorella, plant foods are poor sources of human-active B12.

All usual B12 sources, such as meat, eggs, and dairy won’t do much if one’s small intestines are lacking the intrinsic factor. The intrinsic factor is a special protein produced in the small intestine that is key to extracting B12 from foods and assimilating it into the blood.

That’s why meat and dairy consumers are not exempt from vitamin B12 deficiency. The usual symptoms of fatigue, depression, anxiety, and anemia are overwhelmed by many more physical and neurological manifestations than commonly known. Regardless of diet, it’s estimated over 80 percent of the population is vitamin B12 deficient.

Proper testing and supplementation should be looked into by everyone whose health is sub-par or manifesting any symptoms listed in this source (http://www.vega-licious.com).

Getting the best B12 test and supplements
The blood serum test commonly used counts both types of B12, human-inactive and human-active. Only human-active B12 should be counted. If your blood serum test is normal or better, 150 to 200 or higher, and you are still experiencing symptoms of low energy and bad health, indirect testing should be tried.

Testing urine for high amounts of Methylmalonic Acid (MMA) is more accurate. MMA is high when B12 metabolism is low. Another indirect indicator is a high homocysteine. High homocysteine levels lead to cardiac problems. As indirect indicators, both MMA and homocysteine have inverse relationships to B12 levels.

There are three types of B12: cyanocobalamin, hydroxycabalamin, and methylcobalamin. Of these three, experts agree that methylcobalamin is the most beneficial.

However, the most commonly used B12 for supplements and doctors’ injections, cyanocobalamin, is the worst. It’s been observed to be counterproductive by diminishing the body’s methyl groups that are necessary to assimilate B12.

Look or ask for methylcobalamin to supplement vitamin B12. It can be taken as a body patch or sublingual tablet for direct absorption into the blood to avoid digestive issues that often impede B12 assimilation.


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Paul Fassa is dedicated to warning others about the current corruption of food and medicine and guiding others toward a direction for better health with no restrictions on health freedom. You can visit his blog at http://healthmaven.blogspot.com

Many thanks to Natural News for use of this article. 

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