Unbalanced diets lead to unbalanced minds

A staggering 20.9 million Americans suffer from mood disorders that may be linked to dietary choices. Researchers are exploring the effect of poor diet on the mind while searching for straightforward answers to our emotional woes. Findings suggest a varied, nutrient dense diet can significantly alter brain chemistry, leading to more balanced, clear, and joyful mental states.

The power of complex carbohydrates on mood

Consuming a nourishing diet reaches far beyond just simply supporting physical health. Mental functioning, emotional state, and behavior are all influenced by the quality and variety of the food ingested.

According to Trudy Scott, a nutritionist and spokesperson for the National Association of Nutrition Professionals, “I’ve seen people make dramatic improvements in depression and anxiety within a week of making some simple dietary changes.”

Take, for example, carbohydrates which have gone out of fashion over recent years in favor of high-protein diets. Research has shown that anger, fatigue, depression, and tension are much more prominent in low-carb dieters than those who balance their protein intake with complex carbohydrates. In order for the body to produce serotonin, a feel-good neurotransmitter responsible for curbing the appetite, improving mood, and calming stress, carbohydrates are required.

The type of carbohydrate consumed is extremely important to avoid a roller-coaster ride of fluctuating moods. Abstain from sugar-laden foods such as candy, cakes and cookies. The same for potatoes, white bread and flour. These foods create a vicious emotional cycle of peaks and valleys by flooding the system with simple sugars. The body compensates by releasing insulin, which causes blood sugar levels to plummet. In response, cortisol production goes into full swing, attempting to balance this downward spiral. As cortisol surges, so does depression. This triggers yet another cycle of ingesting simple carbohydrates to boost serotonin and mood.

When the focus shifts from simple to complex carbohydrates, a person’s temperamental landscape changes for the better. Whole grains such as oats, quinoa, barley, amaranth, and brown, red, or black rice release carbohydrates slowly, keeping blood sugar levels and emotions stable. Beans are another excellent source of these healthful carbs.

Three key nutrients for emotional harmony

Omega-3 oils also have a tremendous impact on emotional health. Studies show that people who are deficient in this fatty acid have higher levels of impulsiveness, pessimism, and depression. Omega-3’s can be found in fish such as sardines, salmon, and mackerel. Other excellent sources include organic canola oil, ground flaxseeds, walnuts, and omega-3 enhanced eggs.

Deficiency in iron and thiamine adds to emotional instability as well. Insufficient levels of iron is associated with fatigue, lack of attention, and depression. Foods that are iron-rich include egg yolks, dried fruit, beets, beans, and black-colored foods. As seen in the Darthmouth Undergraduate Journal of Science, inadequate levels of thiamine caused “introversion, inactivity, fatigue, decreased self-confidence, and a poorer mood.” This vitamin can be found in nutritional yeast, cauliflower, eggs, and whole cereal grains.

When nutrient-rich food is prominent in the diet, positive mental states are strengthened, thus encouraging greater focus, zest, and clarity along with a healthy dose of serenity.


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About the author:
As a nutritionist, natural foods chef, and wellness coach, Carolanne has encouraged others to embrace a healthy lifestyle of organic living, gratefulness, and joyful orientation for over 13 years. Through her website www.Thrive-Living.net she looks forward to connecting with other like-minded people from around the world who share a similar vision.

Many thanks to Natural News for the use of this article.

4 comments

  1. Pingback: Eating Better: The Best Trick for a Productive Day
  2. Pingback: Unbalanced diets lead to unbalanced minds | sen...
  3. Pingback: Is Your Bad Mood Caused by Your Poor Diet? « The Epigenetics Project Blog

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